Credit Card Debt Consolidation – The Hidden Dangers

Credit card debt consolidation sounds great, pay off high interest bills, but credit card debt consolidation has hidden dangers that you must be aware of before you proceed. Drowning in debt can be frustrating and anxiety filled but make sure the relief you seek is truly beneficial to you, let’s discuss what to watch out for.

Credit card debt consolidation loans offer the ability to swoop in and pay off your high interest card debt, allowing you to apply more of your payments towards your balance owed and seize control of your finances back from your creditors. It seems like an easy choice on the surface, and in most cases it is beneficial but there are some common financial traps you must avoid if you get a consolidation loan.

Remember that your new loan is just that, a loan, with financing fees and charges for the approval of your new consolidation loan. This in and of itself is normal, but be wary of companies that charge very high financing charges for the privilege of your loan. You may be reducing your rates with the new loan but there is no reason that you should pay more than you have to finance your consolidation.

Many credit card debt consolidation companies will offer to negotiate settlement of your debt on your behalf with your creditor. What this means is they will negotiate with your debt holder to have a portion of your debt forgiven in return for an immediate pay off of the remaining amount with the consolidation loan. This is very commonly accepted by credit card companies for delinquent accounts as they would rather write off the debt and get paid a little than risk your bankruptcy and non payment in full.

If you choose to settle your credit card debt, simply be aware of the tax ramifications for doing so, forgiven debt is typically looked upon as income come tax time with the IRS. For large settlements you might wish to seek the consultation of an accountant or tax attorney in order to receive a professional consult for your situation.

Also be aware of the affect settlement and consolidation will have on your credit score. You may already have bad credit, and are not in the process of rebuilding yet, then this won’t concern you much. Settlement of your debt has a negative impact on your credit score, and can take years to rebuild from.

Lastly, always be sure to work with a reputable and trusted online credit card debt consolidation company. There are many services fighting for your business, some promise more than they can deliver. There are companies that have earned their trust over many years through hard work and service to people just like you, stick with them for your next consolidation loan.

Your Business Mission – What the Heck Do You Do, Anyway?

Do you really need a business mission statement? Is it just some fancy words to put in that business plan that collections dust on your shelf, or is there really more to it?

One of the key attributes of successful businesses is that they clearly know what they do. Defining the goal or the "mission" of your business can be the key to your success.

A good mission statement does three things:

"States what business you are in." Defines your target market. "Provides inspiration for your business.

One of the best examples of a mission statement comes from Levi Strauss & Co. [http://www.levistrauss.com/Company/ValuesAndVision.aspx]

"We will market and distribute the most appealing and widely worn apparel brands. Our products define quality, style and function. We will clothe the world."

Clothing the world is a pretty lofty goal, but Levi Strauss has the ability to do this for one reason — Their founder, Levi Strauss, started the business with a mission and focus.

Levi started his wholesale dry goods business in San Francisco February, 1853. Rather than hoping to make his fortune in the Gold Rush, he created a fortune by wholesaling clothing and fabric to the small stores supplying the thousands of miners and later, families of the West.

In 1872, he was contacted by Jacob Davis, a tailor who had developed a method to rivet the stress points of the pants he made from fabric he bought from-you guessed it — Levi Strauss. Jacob did not have the funds to patent the process, so he teamed up with Levi Strauss to patent the original blue jean in 1873. The rest is history.

Now, if Levi Strauss was your typical small business, he would probably have spun off in ten different directions in their early years, but the company remained focused on supplying quality clothing and fabrics to the working men and women of the West, and later the world. Rather than focusing on their core market, they would have fallen into the AFAB method … Anything for a Buck.

Most small businesses suffer from this lack of focus.

When we work with struggling business owners, the first thing we ask them is "What is your bread and butter?" What one product or service provides you with the majority of your business profit?

Unfortunately, most business owners can not answer that question. They did not define their core product or service and target market when they started, and end up doing a little bit of everything, and nothing well.

Or, they focus most of their time on a product or service line that they like, without knowing whether it actually is their most profitable.

Fortunately, there is an easy fix for this problem.

You have to determine your gross profit margin from each of your product lines or services. Get together with your accountant, and figure out what you need to do to separate your revenue and expenses by the major product lines of your business. Then, you can find out your gross profit margin, or the percentage of gross profit you receive from each activity.

The product or service with the highest gross profit margin is your core business activity. It is the bread and butter of your business, and the key to your company profits.

Now, you must focus as much of your company resources as possible on this core activity. Market it, systemize it, and turn your business into a machine for duplicating this product or service over and over again.

What happens?

Well, rather than running around like a chicken with your head cut off, putting out fires all over your business, you suddenly have the focus to know where to spend your time and energy. You know your core, and you can work to make a good thing even better.

This focus will transform your business and your life.

Remember the term "Jack of All Trades, but Master of None"? You can not really really good at something without focus, and focusing on your most profitable core product or service will make your business even more efficient.

Does this mean that you should never expand beyond your core? Of course not, but you must make sure you are really good at your core product or service before you venture into different directions. Creating a strong bread and butter business will give you the base necessary to expand.

Your core product or service is the foundation for your business. Build it well.

Training in Traditional Chinese Medicine

When you're ready to achieve your degree or certificate in one of the world's most ancient healing arts, then you should acquire training in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). With programs ranging from certification in Tuina (Chinese medical massage) to a doctorate in Oriental medicine, the educational options are wide open.

To earn your masters in acupuncture and Oriental medicine (MSTOM), training in traditional Chinese medicine entails anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, acupuncture and oriental medicine (fundamentals, diagnosis, and treatment); acupuncture point locations, applications and theory; acupuncture and needling techniques; auricular acupuncture (ear acupuncture), Tai Chi, Qi Gong, Chinese herbology, Eastern nutrition, Tuina, moxibustion, cupping, and more.

If you're interested in becoming a professional doctor of acupuncture and Oriental medicine (DAOM) practiceer, comprehensive training in traditional Chinese medicine is critical. While courses vary with respect to prerequisites, general doctrine programs require a great deal of commitment; usually over 1,200 training hours. In addition to philosophies, principles and training in traditional Chinese medicine (and advanced studies of the masters program), coursework includes family medicine, medical Chinese language, and application of Chinese classics, among others.

Some training in traditional Chinese medicine colleges includes associate and bachelor degree programs as well. These courses are often geared towards Eastern holistic health, nutrition, and herbal medicine.

If you're strapped for time but want to acquire some training in traditional Chinese medicine, you can apply to one of the many Asian bodywork or Tuina certification programs. In addition to learning about anatomy and physiology, students enrolled in these programs gain training in traditional Chinese medicine theories and philosophies, instrumental Tuina hand and structural techniques, Shiatsu, acupressure, Qi Gong, as well as basic CPR and first aid.

If you (or someone you know) are interested in learning more about these or other TCM programs, let professional training within fast-growing industries like massage therapy, naturopathy, acupuncture, herbal medicine, Reiki, and others get you started! Explore training in traditional Chinese medicine [http://school.holisticjunction.com/clickcount.php?id=6634739&goto=http://www.holisticjunction.com/search.cfm] near you.

Training in Traditional Chinese Medicine
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The Biggest Challenge For Cloud Computing In 2012

Cloud computing has become quite the buzzword in the IT world. Whether you prefer to use the term cloud services, cloud hosting, cloud computing, or whatever … you need to be aware of the challenges and what you're getting into before you jump right into it.

Security always appears top of the list, coupled with what I interpret as confusion over how and what is needed to make best use of the cloud. So in short, for me, a lack of understanding remains the challenge. Whilst security is critical, I feel the need to provide some counter points.

Any computer connected to the Internet is at risk from hackers, whether it is in the cloud or in a private data center. Would it be true to say that an SME, with necessarily limited resources, is able to better secure its data than say Amazon? In addition, who says everything needs to be in the cloud? Adopting a cloud computing strategy is not an 'all or nothing' decision. Data can remain within a data center or on promise, while applications that need to access such data can be based in the cloud. That's the whole principle behind the different cloud types – private, public or hybrid.

I think that anyone considering a move to the cloud needs to carefully consider their motivations and objectives for doing so, and to question what data and workflows they and their customers will feel happy placing in the cloud. Most importantly, select a vendor that can accommodate your cloud migration strategy, now and in the future. The challenge in 2012 is not that of cloud computing, the challenge for cloud vendors or providers of Cloud 'services' is that they need to not only promote the benefits of their particular offering, but also educate the market on the benefits of cloud, full stop.

Another major challenge will be Bandwidth. It's probably the case that the majority of SME / Bs have 'plenty' of local network bandwidth with which to conduct their in-house operations / business, however, it's also probably the case that in their pipe (s) into the 'Cloud' and that could be an awkward bottleneck if you swallowed the cloud philosophy without adequate preparation – which, of course, you'd never do.

For the pessimists amongst you, please see Moore's Law and Nielson's Law, there's always Parkinson's Law, which reads: "Usage expends so as to fill all available bandwidth."